1. aintiawomancollective:

    CALL-OUT: GET INVOLVED WITH THE AIN’T I A WOMAN COLLECTIVE

     
  2. rmovement:

    Check out the leaflet for our launch event on the 19th of July 2014 at Soas (School Of Oriental And African Studies). 

    We will be looking at our aims and action plan, and will have food and an open mic.

    Everyone is Welcome!

     

  3. itooamrisd said: Hi, I too am RISD was created by the Black Artists and Designers club at Rhode Island School of Design. We have chosen to adapt this project to our identity and experiences at the Rhode Island School of Design as artists. We identity not only as black but as artists and how this affects how our work is viewed in the classroom. We would really appreciate if you would support our project as it continues to grow and spread!!!

    You have all my support!!!

     
  4. theanomalousn:

    Arrrghh. How is this kind of thing happening at the School of Oriental and African Studies??

    As a former SOAS student, I am ashamed.

    (Go to the I Too Am SOAS blog to read more hideously cringe-worthy examples of casual racism.)

     
  5. I have been invited by #itooamoxford to take part in the conference “BME: Dissidence in an Era of Diversity” at Oxford the 24th of May. I will be speaking on “Activism in the Age of New Media: American Methods British Institutions” about  #itooamsoas

    More details here:https://www.facebook.com/events/539447162826795/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

     
  6. jslr:

    Stands to reason. Beyond itooamoxford.tumblr.com, there’s also itooamsoas.tumblr.com and wetooarecambridge.tumblr.com, capturing the experiences of “students of colour”. Most of the images give pause. Every now and then, one of them hits particularly hard.

    (Source: itooamsoas)

     

  7. Anonymous said: I am a student as SOAS and I am in support of I too am SOAS. I would like to ask: is it ever appropriate to ask someone about: where they are from, their religion or language/culture?

    it depends on the context and how you do it. and when you do ask you should not ask with assumptions already in mind. usually when a non-person of colour asks a person of colour their background it’s usually because they can’t reconcille their skin colour, religion, language  with how the poc is presenting himself in the conversation. basically you should rid yourself of the attempt to box someone just because they don’t correspond to what you’re accustomed to. your curiosity should not be invasive.

     

  8. itooamsoas:

    I love the project! I tell people that despite the fact that we go to a university that is lauded for its diversity and development work, I’ve never experienced more microagression and racial insensitivity than in SOAS. What makes it so frustrating is that because we study Africa…

     
  9. toblackgirls:

    Hope you have all had a chance to check out, itooamoxford.tumblr.com, itooamsoas.tumblr.com and  wetooarecambridge.tumblr.com.

    Continuing on the subject of institutional racism in Higher Education, UCL recently held a panel discussion looking at the lack of Black professors in the UK. Of the 18510 professors in UK, 85 are of African and Caribbean descent. You can listen to the audio from the event here

    (via fearofabrownuniverse)

     

  10. Thank you for opening the discussion on being black in SOAS

    I love the project! I tell people that despite the fact that we go to a university that is lauded for its diversity and development work, I’ve never experienced more microagression and racial insensitivity than in SOAS. What makes it so frustrating is that because we study Africa in class, learn African languages and go to African countries for internships, students think that that is a free pass to say racially insensitive things.

    For example, in my first year, there was a girl who thought it was funny to declare that I was ‘her slave’. I hate confrontation so I shrugged it off, pretended to ignore her jokes. She’d mimic my accent in a way that I found so annoying but again, because I didn’t want to be ‘that angry black girl’ I’d either laugh as if I found it funny or ignore her. I specifically remember one afternoon as everyone was coming back from the 10 minute break in the lecture she bounded up the steps in the lecture hall towards me holding a chocolate muffin. ‘You know, you resemble this muffin, you’re colour I mean’ she said in a loud voice that carried through the lecture hall. I wish I could go back to that day and give her a piece of my mind but what I did instead was ignore her and look straight ahead. I really did not want to be identified as the angry, bitter, black girl, but if any place could try your patience, it’s SOAS.